Kewaskum, Wisconsin

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Kewaskum, Wisconsin
Intersection of US 45 and WIS 28 in downtown Kewaskum
Intersection of US 45 and WIS 28 in downtown Kewaskum
Location of Kewaskum in Fond du Lac County (top) and Washington County (bottom), Wisconsin.
Location of Kewaskum in Fond du Lac County (top) and Washington County (bottom), Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 43°30′51″N 88°13′24″W / 43.51417°N 88.22333°W / 43.51417; -88.22333Coordinates: 43°30′51″N 88°13′24″W / 43.51417°N 88.22333°W / 43.51417; -88.22333
Country United States
State Wisconsin
CountiesWashington & Fond du Lac
Settled1852
Incorporated1895
Area
 • Total2.35 sq mi (6.10 km2)
 • Land2.35 sq mi (6.10 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation935 ft (285 m)
Population
 • Total4,004
 • Estimate 
(2019)[4]
4,264
 • Density1,811.38/sq mi (699.38/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s)262
FIPS code55-39325[5]
GNIS feature ID1583474[2]
Websitevillage.kewaskum.wi.us

Kewaskum is a village in Washington and Fond du Lac counties in Wisconsin, United States. The population was 4,004 at the 2010 census. All of this population resided in the Washington County portion of the village. The village is mostly surrounded by the Town of Kewaskum.

Kewaskum water tower

Toponymy[edit]

Kewaskum was the leader of a group of Potawatomi Native Americans who lived in Washington County in the 1840s.[6] He was friendly with the early settlers, including future Wisconsin state senator Densmore Maxon.[7] He died sometime between 1847 and 1850. In 1849, the early settlers named the Town of Kewaskum (and later the village) in his honor. In the Potawatomi language, Kewaskum means "turning back on his tracks" or "retracing his steps."[8]

History[edit]

In the early 19th century, the Kewaskum area was home to Potawatomi Native Americans, who surrendered the land the United States Federal Government in 1833 through the Treaty of Chicago, which required them to leave Wisconsin by 1838.[9] While many Potawatomis moved west of the Mississippi River to Kansas, some chose to remain, and were referred to as "strolling Potawatomi" in contemporary documents because many of them were migrants who subsisted by squatting on their ancestral lands, which were now owned by white settlers.[10] One band of strolling Potawatomi travelled through Dodge, Jefferson, and Washington counties, and was led by Chief Kewaskum, who had a camp on Pike Lake. The chief was friendly with the white settlers who began arriving in the 1840s.[7] He died sometime between 1847 and 1850,[8] but itinerant Potawatomis lived in Washington County into the late 19th century, when many of them gathered in northern Wisconsin to form the Forest County Potawatomi Community.[10]

The first settlers in the area were the Barnes family, who arrived in 1844 and began farming near the future village.[11] In 1847, the Wisconsin Territorial Legislature created the Town of North Bend from land that had previously been part of the Town of West Bend, and the community's first post office was established.[11] In 1849, the residents changed their community's name to the "Town of Kewaskum" to distinguish it from neighboring West Bend.[12]

While the first settlers were primarily farmers, the village of Kewaskum traces its origins to J. H. Myer, who settled on a horseshoe bend in the Milwaukee River in 1852 and later built a sawmill and a gristmill. The settlement, which was originally known as "Myer's Mill" and later as "Kewaskum Center,"[12] soon became a market town with a general store and a blacksmith shop serving the local farmers. The first religious services were held in private homes, and in 1862 the Catholic villagers constructed a church. A German Methodist church was built in 1866 and a Lutheran church was built in 1868.[11] In 1873, the Chicago and North Western Railway completed a line from Milwaukee to Fond du Lac with a station in Kewaskum.[13] The community's rail connections caused the local economy to grow and prosper as new businesses, including hotels, stores, and grain elevators opened around the station.[12][14] The Village of Kewaskum incorporated in 1895.[15]

While the village economy was primarily agricultural in the 19th and early 20th centuries, Kewaskum became increasingly industrialized throughout the 1900s. In 1919, Adolph J. Rosenheimer founded the Kewaskum Aluminum Company in the village to manufacture aluminum cookware. During World War II, the company made aluminum products for military use, before being acquired by Enterprise Aluminum Company of Ohio in 1945. The company was renamed Regal Ware in 1951, and through acquisitions of aluminum companies in Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, and Mississippi, moved into the international high-end consumer cookware market.[16] The community's population grew during the post–World War II economic expansion, leading the village to annex land from the Town of Kewaskum for new commercial and residential developments. The village first annexed land in 1959 and again in twenty of the next forty-six years.[17] Additionally, Kewaskum annexed a noncontiguous parcel of land in the Town of Auburn in Fond du Lac County in 1963.[18]

Geography[edit]

The primary north–south highway serving Kewaskum is U.S. Route 45, and the primary east–west highway is Wisconsin Highway 28. Kewaskum is located in the 262 Area Code of south-eastern Wisconsin, with Prefix 626.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.45 square miles (6.35 km2), all of it land.[19]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880471
189055718.3%
190067921.9%
1910625−8.0%
192070713.1%
193079913.0%
194088010.1%
19501,18334.4%
19601,57232.9%
19701,92622.5%
19802,39424.3%
19902,5155.1%
20003,27430.2%
20104,00422.3%
2019 (est.)4,264[4]6.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[20]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 4,004 people, 1,581 households, and 1,148 families living in the village. The population density was 1,634.3 inhabitants per square mile (631.0/km2). There were 1,698 housing units at an average density of 693.1 per square mile (267.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 96.0% White, 0.5% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 1.2% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.9% of the population.

There were 1,581 households, of which 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.9% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 27.4% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median age in the village was 36.8 years. 25.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 29.7% were from 25 to 44; 24.9% were from 45 to 64; and 12.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 49.0% male and 51.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 3,274 people, 1,212 households, and 895 families living in the village. The population density was 2,217.3 people per square mile (854.1/km2). There were 1,264 housing units at an average density of 856.0 per square mile (329.8/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.95% White, 0.27% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. 0.92% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,212 households, out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.1% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the village, the population was spread out, with 27.4% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 19.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $49,861, and the median income for a family was $55,144. Males had a median income of $37,639 versus $25,806 for females. The per capita income for the village was $20,509. About 4.0% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 18, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. ^ Chicago and North Western Railway Company (1908). A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railways. p. 90.
  7. ^ a b Quickert, Carl (1912). Washington County, Wisconsin: Past and Present. Chicago, IL: S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 33.
  8. ^ a b "About Kewaskum". Kewaskum Public Library. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  9. ^ "Early history of Ozaukee County, Wisconsin". University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b "Potawatomi History". Milwaukee Public Museum. Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c "Condensed History of Kewaskum". Kewaskum Statesman. Kewaskum, Wisconsin. May 18, 1918. Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  12. ^ a b c "Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: Kewaskum". University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  13. ^ "Depot History: The Chicago and North Western Railway in West Bend A Brief Summary". Ozaukee Washington Land Trust. Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  14. ^ "About Kewaskum WI". Kewaskum Area Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  15. ^ "About This Collection". Kewaskum Public Library. Retrieved December 28, 2019.
  16. ^ "Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: Regal Ware Worldwide". University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Retrieved August 23, 2020.
  17. ^ Annexations of the Town of Kewaskum occurred in 1959, 1960, 1962, 1965, 1966, 1973, 1976, 1978, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1996, 1998, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005. http://sos.nmtvault.com/SearchResults.aspx?City=V212[permanent dead link]
  18. ^ http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_006/images/00003677.pdf The Wisconsin Department of Transportation did not become aware of this until 2003. http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docview.asp?docid=2270
  19. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 2, 2012. Retrieved November 18, 2012.
  20. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  21. ^ 'L. D. Guth-obituary,' Wisconsin State Journal, March 16, 1939, part 2, pg. 1
  22. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1953,' Biographical Sketch of William Haebig, pg. 60

External links[edit]